ber

 

Example of sand berm

Example of preemptive sand berm - this one from Topsail Hill State Park, Gulf Shores, Florida - blocking outwash from coastal lake. (Photo by Gerry Ellis/Audubon/Minden Pictures)

 

While in the midst of writing two new posts for this blog and preparing to fly out over the Chandeleur Islands east of the Mississippi River – and one of the most impacted areas on the Gulf Coast – this article was sent to me from this morning’s The Times-Picayune here in Louisiana.  It focuses a sharp light on the fact that the impacts of the BP oil disaster may be only beginning.

“BATON ROUGE — Louisiana received its third $60 million check from BP on Tuesday to pay a share of the cost of building berms along barrier islands, and the state’s coastal czar again defended the controversial use of sand as an effective tool in capturing oil from the BP spill.

Tuesday’s check means the state has received half of the $360 million that BP committed to build about 100 miles of sandy spits along the Chandeleur islands on the east side of the Mississippi River and along several barrier islands on the river’s west side, Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority Chairman Garret Graves told members of the authority.

Asked whether the state is reconsidering the berm projects, given that independent scientists and several federal agencies have criticized them as ineffective and harmful to fisheries and wildlife, Graves said the 6-foot-high by 200-foot-wide artificial islands are successfully collecting oil.”

For the rest of the article

La. gets BP aid, defends berms

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